Blog topic: Artificial intelligence

Glynn, Sally, Christy, Alyssa, Gurudarshan, David, Franz, Ann, Annie, Brian, and Laura

Special Collections in Redwood City pivots to digital projects during COVID-19 shelter-in-place

In the beginning of March, managers at Stanford Libraries began talking about working remotely and decided to set up shifts in each department – half working two weeks on site and half two weeks remotely. By the 6th of March the teams for our Collection Services group out in Redwood City were assembled, and the first group – Aries – stayed home for their first week. The Libraries were only one week into that first shift, when the state of California and Stanford decided that everyone should shelter at home starting on the 16th. The Aries team was taken off guard - we all were. Although we had discussed and lined up remote projects, not everyone had taken their computer and ergonomic equipment home with them. A few of us went in to grab equipment (desktop computers, monitors, etc.) and forgotten items (like reading glasses!) and drove around making deliveries – not everyone in the Bay Area drives a car! 

An artwork by James Bridle that shows a car surrounde by a solid white line an a broken white line.

Is learning about AI in libraries preparation for a future without librarians?

April 1, 2020
by Catherine Nicole Coleman

The image associated with this post is from "Autonomous Trap" by James Bridle.

If you attended or watched the talks at Fantastic Futures December 2019, you know that the answer to that question is emphatically No. Both of the keynote speakers addressed the essential role of libraries in providing curated data to improve AI and in preserving the data, models, and records for oversight of how the technology is implemented. Lightning talks (recordings available) demonstrated applications of AI by practitioners operating within libraries, archives, and museums. And Teemu Roos presented Elements of AI, a free online course for everyone designed to demystify AI.

Technology should reflect the ethos of the library

At the VALA2020 conference on Libraries and Technology last month I stated, as I have in numerous other presentations, reports, and recommendations, that implementations of technology (and I am usually speaking about AI) in libraries should reflect the ethos of the library. I say this not because the ethos of the library is correct, just, or even well-defined; but it is something to which we who work in libraries can be held accountable.

Fantastic Futures logo

Fantastic Futures 2019 Conference

October 2, 2019
by Catherine Nicole Coleman

Stanford Libraries will host the 2nd International Conference on  AI for Libraries, Archives, and Museums over three days, December 4, 5 & 6, 2019. The first 'Fantastic Futures' conference, which took place in December 2018 at the National Library of Norway in Oslo, initiated a community-focused approach to addressing the challenges and possibilities for libraries, archives, and museums in the era of artificial intelligence.

Warhol, AI, and the Idea of the Archive

AI and the Andy Warhol Photography Archive. Contact sheets as big data.

Monday, March 4, 2019 from 4:00 pm - 5:30 in the Bender Room at Green Library, Peggy Phelan and Maneesh Agrawala will join the library's digital research architect, Nicole Coleman to discuss the
Andy Warhol Photography Archive, Contact Sheets: 1976 - 1987 and how technology is changing our relationship with media.

Androids, Automata, Avatars, and Agency

January 30, 2019
by Catherine Nicole Coleman

On Tuesday, February 5, in the Bender Room at Green Library, Jessica Riskin and Oussama Khatib will join Nicole Coleman in conversation about robotics past and future. Both have been thinking deeply about artificial life and artificial intelligence throughout their careers. While Khatib has been building robots and breaking new ground in human-robot collaboration, Riskin’s work explores the way that early automatons influenced the mechanistic view of mind and body, evolution and inheritance, and how our relationship to machines continues to influence our thinking today about whether human beings have agency in shaping their destiny.

Graph of pageviews

SDR Deposit of the Month: Dissertation on AI breakthrough makes leaderboard

Occasionally I review the analytics for content published via the Stanford Digital Repository to see what is currently trending. Upon returning to my Lathrop desk in January after the recent winter break, I checked in and discovered that a dissertation submitted last month by student Danqi Chen had enjoyed a whopping 2,736 pageviews in just four weeks since it was published on December 11, 2018. That is an extraordinarily impressive number!

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