Blog topic: Born digital

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Lighting the Way Forum presentations to be livestreamed on February 10, 2020

January 31, 2020
by Mark A. Matienzo

Lighting the Way: A National Forum on Archival Discovery and Delivery kicks off with a series of livestreamed presentations on archival discovery and delivery on February 10, 2020 from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM Pacific Standard Time (GMT-8).

We encourage you to register for the livestream in advance so you can join in for what we hope will be an engaging set of presentations on four key themes:

  • The Evolving Systems Ecosystem: What software and other systems do we use to make archival discovery and delivery possible, and how is that changing within institutional contexts?
  • Networks and the Big Picture: What issues are impacting archives and libraries at the level of the sector, consortia, or beyond, related to discovery and delivery?
  • Ethical, Legal, and Cultural Concerns: How have factors like privacy, cultural protocols, copyright, and others impacted our ability to address archival discovery and delivery, on a technical, operational, or strategic level? 
  • Impacts on Public Services and Outreach: How does archival discovery and delivery fit within the front-line work of library and archives workers focused on reference, outreach, public service, and community needs?

For more information on the event, see agenda and detailed list of presentations. Follow the event on Twitter using the hashtag #LTWForum.

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Lighting the Way project update, January 2020

January 22, 2020
by Mark A. Matienzo

The last few months have been busy for the Lighting the Way project, but we realize that not all of that activity has been visible. As you may know, we will also be hosting Lighting the Way: A National Forum on Archival Discovery and Delivery in just three weeks at Stanford University, from February 10-12, 2020. Accordingly, we realized that now is an appropriate time as any to provide you with some updates with what our project team and participant advisors have been working on since September 2019.

Stanford University Libraries receives Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funding for ePADD phase three development

January 17, 2020
by Sally DeBauche

We are excited to announce that the ePADD project has been awarded a grant by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the planning and future development of the ePADD software!

ePADD is free and open-source computational analysis software developed by Stanford University Libraries Special Collections & University Archives and partners that facilitates screening, browsing, and access for historically and culturally significant email collections.

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Lighting the Way Forum call for participation now open

November 13, 2019
by Mark A. Matienzo

Stanford University Libraries invites archives, library, and technology workers and those in related fields to self-nominate as participants for Lighting the Way: A National Forum on Archival Discovery and Delivery, funded by IMLS grant LG-35-19-0012-19. The forum event will take place over two and a half  at Stanford University in Stanford, California from February 10-12, 2020, with approximately 50 participants. Grant funds will allow us to fund partial to full travel costs, meals during the event, and lodging for most participants. 

To apply, please complete the application formPDF iconPDF version of the application form is available for your reference.

The initial call for participation will be open from November 13 to December 15, 2019. The application form requests information about you, your responsibilities, and your work related to focus of the project. Our project team will be reviewing the nominations on a rolling basis, and will respond no later than January 10, 2020. Information gathered in the application form will be used to select participants for the Forum, to inform Forum planning, and to identify opportunities for the project team to follow up with you. Your responses will not be shared beyond the project team and its participant advisors.

Nazraeli Press, Deanna & Ed Templeton

Fall 2019 - Cataloging, Metadata & Processing Projects Underway in Redwood City (Part 1)

October 16, 2019
by Glynn Edwards

Part One - Regular Staff in Collection Services

The regular staff in the Collection Services arm of the Department of Special Collections & University Archives has finally unpacked from our last relocation in July and settled into our new space in Academy Hall on Stanford’s Redwood City campus. It is a great relief to see our cataloging, processing and digital units once again hard at work and various collections spread out in our workroom. As always, they, and all of those behind the scenes in Redwood City and our colleagues on campus, did a phenomenal job!

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Lighting the Way: illuminating the future of discovery and delivery for archives

August 19, 2019
by Mark A. Matienzo

We are pleased to announce Lighting The Way: A National Forum on Archival Discovery and Delivery, a year-long project running from September 1, 2019 to August 31, 2020, funded by the National Leadership Grants for Libraries program of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Lighting the Way will convene a series of national meetings focused on enhancing discovery and delivery for archives and special collections. The project builds on current and past efforts at Stanford Libraries around archives and technology, including ArcLightePADD, and the AIMS project.

In October 2019, the project team will launch an open application and nomination process for a National Forum, scheduled for January 2020, dedicated to discussion and brainstorming about both current successes and challenges to effective archival discovery and delivery. Project funding includes participant support costs for archives, library, and technology workers interested in improving how user-facing systems that support archival discovery and delivery work together. Find out more about Lighting the Way, including information on the project team, its goals, and its expected outcomes on our project website.

Chinese Deathscape cover

CIDR project "The Chinese Deathscape" is published by Stanford University Press

March 20, 2019

The Stanford Libraries' Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) is proud to share in the announcement of a new publication, by the Stanford University Press, of The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China, a longstanding collaboration led the publication's editor, Professor Thomas S. Mullaney of the Department of History, and featuring custom design and software development primarily by former CIDR developer David McClure.

This publication is the latest in SU Press's Digital Scholarship series of interactive scholarly works, and the first fully peer-reviewed and professionally published of CIDR's many projects in the digital humanities and computational social sciences.

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