Blog topic: Fun facts

Databases of the week: Holocaust survivor video testimonies

October 1, 2019
by Anna M Levia

The purpose of oral history testimony is not only to gather facts, but also to gain a deeper understanding of events as they were lived and filtered through personal reflection. Unlike most documentation from th[e] period - written by the perpetrators – oral testimony gives a voice to the survivors and other witnesses, allowing them to speak directly about their personal experiences. [Source: Visual History Archive website.]

Celebrating Preservation Week 2019

April 22, 2019
by Annie Matthys

This week (April 21 - April 27, 2019) is Preservation Week, a week devoted to, “…highlight[ing] what we can do, individually and together, to preserve our personal and shared collections” (American Library Association).

Josephine Baker

2019 International Women's Day

March 7, 2019
by Kimberly R. Kay

March 8, 2019 is International Women's Day, and Stanford Libraries would like to share some of our outstanding collections focusing on women! When I put out the call to our staff for collections that celebrate women, I was overwhelmed by the response. The subjects range from women who were integral to Stanford's history to feminist activists and writers to educators, artists, and pioneers in their fields. Here are just a few fantastic resources found at Stanford Libraries:

Becoming Stanford: New Spotlight at Stanford exhibit explores the history and meaning of Stanford's Insignia

January 7, 2019
by Josh Schneider

Have you ever wondered why Stanford is represented by the color cardinal, and not the original choice of gold? Or why the university's motto is in German?

We are pleased to announce a new Spotlight at Stanford exhibit focused on the development of Stanford's insignia: Becoming Stanford: The History and Meaning of the University’s Insignia.

Mystery in the stacks: Dating a rare Chinese Buddhist book in the Gunst Collection

September 25, 2018
by Joshua Capitanio

I was very interested when recently a colleague from Green Library, David Jordan, alerted me to the existence of several Chinese and Japanese items within the Gunst Collection, also known as the Morgan A. and Aline D. Gunst Memorial Library of the Book Arts.  As the name suggests, this collection, which was donated to Stanford Libaries in 1963 and contains over four thousand volumes, is devoted to works that showcase the role of books as artifacts.  As I was browsing through the short list of East Asian materials belonging to this collection, I was intrigued by one item in particular, which was described as an eleventh-century print of a Chinese Buddhist scripture.

Equipping the Scholarly Workbench: Outreach for strategic alignment

December 14, 2017
by Mimi Calter

As the Stanford Libraries develop to be a fully-realized, 21st Century Scholarly Workbench, we are thinking strategically about the tools that we supply and the services we support.  No workbench can hold every tool, and we must ensure that we deploy our resources to most effectively meet the needs of the always-evolving Stanford community and the broader research community.  To achieve this strategic alignment, the Stanford Libraries rely heavily on outreach by its staff.

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