Blog topic: Government information

Alert 747

ALERT 747 exhibit in Green Library

Alert 747: Suspected Nuclear Test  - A journey to uncover facts and create dialog through humanistic creative production. This February, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) highlights a special collection, Vela 6911 by Victor Gama, with an exhibit on display in the Green Library South Lobby from February 3- March 9, 2015.  Vela 6911 is a multimedia musical piece created by Victor Gama, an Angolan composer and designer of contemporary musical instruments for new music. This exhibit offers a glimpse into this vast collection of research, images, video content and musical scores that reside in the SUL Archive of Recorded Sound.  It also supports and coincides with the March 6th live performance of VELA 6911 by Gama, the Stanford University New Ensemble and special guests from Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). Information about the concert is at the Stanford Events Page. 

Historic "fugitive" US document found and made available by Stanford Libraries

December 18, 2014
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

(NOTE: this was first posted on Free Government Information blog as "What makes a "fugitive document" a fugitive?").

First off, I'd like to thank GPO (now the Government Publishing Office!) for posting about this Historic Fugitive Document Available through the CGP. I'd like to give a little context and parse out what makes a fugitive document -- a document that is within scope of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) but for whatever reason is not distributed by GPO to depository libraries -- a fugitive?

The Official Senate CIA Torture Report

December 11, 2014
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

Yesterday the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence released its "Study of the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program - Foreword, Findings, and Conclusions, and Executive Summary." (BIG PDF!) The report is 525 pages, heavily redacted, and includes graphic details about the torture techniques used by the CIA. The study found that American torture was not confined to a handful of aberrational cases or techniques, nor was it the work of rogue CIA agents. It was an officially sanctioned, worldwide (over 1/4 of the world's countries participated in some way!) regime of torture that had the acquiescence, if not explicit approval, of the top members of both political parties in Congress.

Q&A: Average Tariff Levels

August 11, 2008
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

Question: I'm looking for data on the average tariff levels of various countries from 1962-1989. Any version of the average tariff (weighted average) would be fine.

Q&A: tracing the history of TRIPS agreement

May 14, 2011
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

Question: I am researching on the negotiating history of article 66.2 of the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). I would like to find information on debates that preceded adoption of this Article in the Agreement. I have not been able to find any particular thread in the GATT Archive that would enable me trace this history.

Answer: Thanks for contacting the GATT archive. Here are a few angles to explore in order to trace that history.

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