Blog topic: Open source

ePADD 1st Quarter Update

In January, the ePADD project team began work on the current phase of development to the software, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The focus for this first quarter of the year is on the redevelopment of the ePADD’s attachment review feature. Attachments are a rich source of information in an email collection, providing context to the archive owner’s work, communications, and relationships.

ANSI

ANSI releases select standards for COVID-19 support (UPDATED)

Several librarians across the United States have been petitioning ISO and ANSI to release or open up access to several critical standards in the response efforts to the COVID-19 pandemic. ANSI has announced a portal that contains several of these important standards, including standards for the fabrication of ventilators and standards for incident management response, released to the public. At this time, 31 of these ISO standards have been released, and you can access them by visiting the following links.

Stanford University Libraries receives Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funding for ePADD phase three development

January 17, 2020
by Sally DeBauche

We are excited to announce that the ePADD project has been awarded a grant by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the planning and future development of the ePADD software!

ePADD is free and open-source computational analysis software developed by Stanford University Libraries Special Collections & University Archives and partners that facilitates screening, browsing, and access for historically and culturally significant email collections.

Stanford Libraries & The Carpentries

Stanford Libraries SERG/Carpentries Workshop Series

Stanford University is a member organization of The Carpentries, a nonprofit dedicated to teaching foundational skills for research computing skills. This partnership is managed by Dr. Amy Hodge of the Stanford University Libraries, and is open to the entire campus community. Over the past few quarters the Stanford University Libraries have offered the popular two-day Software Carpentry workshops as an open enrollment to anyone on campus. Other campus organizations have also run and will continue to run similar versions of these workshops.

Announcing the ArcLight Phase II work cycle kickoff

August 19, 2019

Last week, contributors from five institutions – Stanford University, Duke University, Indiana University, University of Michigan, and Princeton University – kicked off a collaborative nine-week work cycle for ArcLight. The work cycle, which runs from August 13 to October 11, 2019, will build on the ArcLight MVP implementation from 2017, and focuses on refining ArcLight’s usability and accessibility, addressing strategic needs in a community-based project. Major areas for this work cycle include:

  • Usability and accessibility refinements, including potential design changes
  • Revamping the tools used for indexing archival description into ArcLight’s Solr index
  • Analysis and implementation supporting better integration with request management systems, digital object viewers, and more

You can follow our work on the #arclight channel on the Code4Lib Slack team or the GitHub project board for the current work cycle. We expect to release public demo videos on YouTube, and will share them on Slack as well as the arclight-community Google Group to report on our progress. The work cycle’s conclusion coincides with the 2019 Blacklight Summit, to be held in Durham, North Carolina from October 9-11.

Call for feedback and contributions to forthcoming ArcLight work cycle

Stanford Libraries is organizing a work cycle later this year for ArcLight, a Rails engine supporting discovery of archival material. The work cycle is expected to run from August 12 to October 11, 2019, with planned contributions in terms of staff and development time from Stanford University, University of Michigan, Indiana University, and Princeton University. This work expands upon the work undertaken between April to June 2017 to develop a minimum viable product, and focuses on adding features, fixing bugs, and ensuring it is better suited as a product for future adoption and development. 

As a part of planning for this work cycle, Stanford, Michigan, Indiana, and Princeton have begun developing a collaborative roadmap to help us scope candidate areas of development. Following the process undertaken recently by the Spotlight community, we are now looking for contributions to and feedback on the roadmap to inform our work. If you’ve previously shared evaluations of ArcLight internal to your organization, we welcome you incorporating your ideas for features and improvements to this document. Our first deadline for contributions to the ArcLight work cycle roadmap is June 28, 2019.

ArcLight MVP work cycle completed

The ArcLight MVP project team has completed our eight-week work cycle to develop a minimum viable product to support discovery and delivery of archival materials using Blacklight, and have released ArcLight 0.1. More details, including a demo video and list of implemented features, follow below. The code for ArcLight, as well as documentation on how to get started can be found on GitHub.

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